Getting Control over a 50 Watt CO2 Laser Cutter from China

There are people around me who think I’m crazy. And they are probably right. Who else would buy a machine from someone he does not know. I have to pay upfront. It is not clear how things will get delivered, what gets delivered, or if it gets delivered at all. Up to the point I can lose the money I have spent. Best of all: that machine is dangerous enough to potentially kill me. And it has the potential to put my home on fire too. Well, that sounds like an exciting weekend project, or not?

Weekend Box

60 kg Weekend Project Box arrived on the front door

Continue reading

Advertisements

Adding CMSIS-SVD Files to EmbSysRegView 0.2.6.r192 and Eclipse

In “EmbSysRegView 0.2.6 for Eclipse Neon and Oxygen” I have described how to add CMSIS-SVD register detail files to Eclipse using the EmbSysRegView plugin.

But what I need to add vendor or any other SVD files to it? Here is how:

EmbSys Registers View

EmbSys Registers View

Continue reading

Building Eclipse and MCUXpresso IDE Projects from the Command Line

Eclipse as IDE takes care about compiling and building all my source files. But in an automated build system I would like to build it from the command line too. While using make files (see “Tutorial: Makefile Projects with Eclipse“) is an option, there is another easy way to build Eclipse projects from the command line:

Building MCUXpresso IDE from Command Line

Building MCUXpresso IDE from Command Line

Continue reading

Oeschinen Lake

Image

This hike has been on my ‘must-hike’ list since last summer, and when I saw Urška writing about recently, it got definitely on my top list of things. The Oeschinen Lake (German: Oeschinensee) is a beautiful lake in the Bernese Overland, Switzerland, east of Kandersteg, and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site:

Öschinensee from Heuberge

Oeschinensee view from Heuberg

Continue reading

Breathing with Oxygen: DIY ARM Cortex-M C/C++ IDE and Toolchain with Eclipse Oxygen

Last month (June 2017), the latest version of Eclipse “Oxygen” has been released, and I have successfully used it in several embedded projects. Time to write a tutorial how to use it to build a custom Do-It-Yourself IDE for ARM Cortex-M development: simple, easy, unlimited and free of charge. While the DIY approach takes a few minutes more to install, it has the advantage that I have full control and I actually know what I have.

Eclipse Oxygen

Eclipse Oxygen

Continue reading

Custom 3D Printed Enclosure for NXP LPC-Link2 Debug Probes

I love 3D printing as it enables me to create custom enclosures for all kind of projects. The NXP LPC-Link2 probe is great, but it lacks a protective enclosure. So I decided to create a custom enclosure. And as 3D filaments are available in different colors, I experimented with red and black and custom painting:

lpc-link2 enclosure

lpc-link2 enclosure

Continue reading

Troubleshooting Tips for FreeRTOS Thread Aware Debugging in Eclipse

FreeRTOS seems to get more and more popular, and I think as well because more and more debugger and Eclipse IDE vendors add dedicated debugging support for it.

FreeRTOS Threads in Eclipse

FreeRTOS Threads in Eclipse

Continue reading

Mostly Sunny, or: Why you should Hike in the Rain: Ibergeregg to Spirstock

Image

So we prepared a hiking trip the day before. The weather forecast said “mostly sunny”.  Only to find out that the weather was not that great in the morning. Yes, true: Technically  the sun is shining, at least above the clouds:

Mostly Sunny or not?

Mostly Sunny? A good day for a hiking tour!

Continue reading

How to use Custom Library Names with GNU Linker and Eclipse

By default, the GNU Linker expects a very special naming scheme for the libraries: the library name has to be surrounded by “lib” and the “.a” extension:

lib<NAME>.a

But what if the library I want to use does not conform to that naming standard?

Non-conforming Library Naming

Non-conforming Library Naming

Continue reading

Tutorial: Makefile Projects with Eclipse

The benefit of an IDE like Eclipse is: it makes working with projects very easy, as generates make files and it takes and automatically manages the make file(s). But sometimes this might not be what I want because I need greater flexibility and control, or I want to use the same make files for my continues integration and automated testing system. In that case a hand crafted make file is the way to go.

One thing does not exclude the other: This article explains how to use make files with Eclipse with similar comfort as the managed build system in Eclipse, but with the unlimited power of make files:

Makefile Project with Eclipse

Makefile Project with Eclipse

Continue reading

Hiking on the Border of Two Cantons

Image

It was a very spontaneous hiking tour this Sunday afternoon: a hike up to the Wildspitz mountain and the border between the Canton Schwyz and Zug. Full of beautiful views, flowers and awesome butterflies!

The boarder between the Canton of Schwyz and Canton of Zug is marked with several stones. Below stone No. 18 (dated 1907) near at Langmatt:

Grenzstein Langmatt

Grenzstein Langmatt

Continue reading

MCUXpresso IDE v10.0.2 – Updated Eclipse based IDE for LPC and Kinetis

NXP has released an updated of their Eclipse based IDE for ARM Cortex-M (Kinetis and LPC) microcontroller: the version v10.0.2 build 411:

MCUXpresso v10.0.2 build 411

MCUXpresso v10.0.2 build 411

Continue reading

Getting Started: ROM Bootloader on the NXP FRDM-KL03Z Board

A bootloader on a microcontroller is a very useful thing. It allows me to update the firmware in the field if necessary. There are many ways to use and make a bootloader (see “Serial Bootloader for the Freedom Board with Processor Expert“). But such a bootloader needs some space in FLASH, plus it needs to be programmed first on a blank device, so a JTAG programmer is needed. That’s why vendors have started including a ROM bootloader into their devices: the microcontroller comes out of the factory with a bootloader in FLASH. So instead writing my bootloader, I can use the one in the ROM.

FRDM-KL03Z with ROM Bootloader

FRDM-KL03Z with ROM Bootloader

And as with everything, there are pros and cons of that approach.

Continue reading

Compiler Explorer

If you are like me – someone who always wants to know what the compiler generates for a piece of source code – then have a look at the Compiler Explorer: A web-based compiler code comparison tool:

Compiler Comparison

Compiler Comparison

Thanks to Matt Godbolt, I can select different compilers and compare their output for a given source code. Very useful to see the impact of a compiler optimization or to compare different GCC compiler versions.

Happy Comparing 🙂

McuOnEclipse Components: 09-July-2017 Release

I’m pleased to announce that a new release of the McuOnEclipse components is available in SourceForge, with the following major changes and updates:

  • Complete refactoring for 1-Wire stack and DS18B20 temperature sensor components
  • Added HID Joystick device class to the FSL_USB_Stack
  • New SDK_Timer component to work with Kinetis SDK
  • New ST756P LCD driver component
  • New TSL2561 digitial temperature sensor driver
  • Added ReadByte() and WriteByte() GenericI2C functions
  • Added 64bit mapping functions to Utility
  • added configUSE_NEWLIB_REENTRANT and newlib reentrancy support to FreeRTOS
  • Pull resistor support for SDK_BitIO
  • Many smaller bug fixes and enhancements
SourceForge

SourceForge

Continue reading

Three more Reasons to Commute by Train in Switzerland

Video

Commuting to work can be boring. I’m gifted that I can use the Swiss train system, and I wrote about the “10 Reasons Why I Love my Train Commute“.

Immensee

Train at Immensee Station

Brendon asked if I need more reasons. I don’t. But there are indeed three more reasons I can share from my work commute today: Three lakes in three minutes. First Lake Lucerne on the right side, then Lake Zug on the left and finally Lake Lauerz on the right. Enjoy the ride:

Happy Commuting 🙂

Using FreeRTOS with newlib and newlib-nano

For reliable applications, I avoid using functions of the standard libraries. They are banned for most safety related applications anyway. I do not use or avoid malloc(), printf() and all the other variants, for many reasons including the ones listed in “Why I don’t like printf()“. Instead, I’m using smaller variants (see “XFormat“). Or I’m using only the thread-safe FreeRTOS heap memory allocation which exist for many good reasons.

Things get problematic if malloc() still is pulled in, either because it is used by a middleware (e.g. TCP/IP stack) or if using C++. Dave Nadler posted a detailed article (http://www.nadler.com/embedded/newlibAndFreeRTOS.html) about how to use newlib and newlib-nano with FreeRTOS.

FreeRTOS Newlib Memory Allocation Scheme

FreeRTOS Newlib Memory Allocation Scheme

Continue reading