DIY Wireless Magnetic Levitating Moon Lamp

If your child is making a special wish, you will do everything to make it happen, right? So my daughter’s wish was a ‘moon lamp’. And here is it: a magnetic levitating (MagLev) wireless moon light:

MagLev wireless LED Moon

MagLev wireless LED Moon

It is the 50th anniversary of moon landing, so I thought that wish needs to be realized.

To build it, I used the following:

 

The wireless LED module gets placed into a 3D printed enclosure:

Wireless LED module

Wireless LED module

The magnet is put inside the enclosure and the LED module glued on top of it:

LED Module with Magnet

LED Module with Magnet

Below a test with the 4″ version of the moon:

4 Inch Moon Version

4 Inch Moon Version

The module gets glued into the moon while it gets printed. Below the 6″ version of it:

LED Module placed into Moon

LED Module placed into Moon

I printed the moon without any support and with 100% infill, using a white PLA. To stabilize, I uses some scrap plywood to keep it in place:

Fixing the Moon while printing

Fixing the Moon while printing

MagLev Base

The original MagLev base came with 8 LEDs on the side. I have cut them and re-attached them to have everything inside a circle.

Ring LEDs

Ring LEDs

Below is a version of the enclosure using laser cut 5mm PMMA/Acrylic:

PMMA Enclosure

PMMA Enclosure

I have put the wireless charging board into the bottom part of the PCB and added an on-off switch to turn off the light:

MagLev Bottom Side

MagLev Bottom Side

Placing the moon on the base takes a bit of practice and should be done quickly, otherwise the coils get very hot and could overheat. The video below shows the process:

The magnetic field can pull away the magnet with up to about 500 g. Of course no sensitive devices should be placed in the magnetic field.

A cool use case is to levitate small things or a cactus on the magnet :-):

MagLev Cactus

MagLev Cactus

Desk Lamp

I have built a version of the moon lamp with a LED bump inside. I used a 40W (10 or 20W would do it as well) LED light bulb with a cable and a switch:

LED Light Bulp

LED Light Bulb

LED Lamp

LED Lamp

The LED bulb then gets placed inside the moon and it can hang up. I used a ‘warm white’ LED here:

Moon Lamp

Moon Lamp

Another option is to use a charged version: this includes an IR sender and a microcontroller board with 4 LEDs (white, red, green, blue). The picture below shows it with a 4″ moon version:

Remote Moon Light

Remote Moon Light

The board with the battery is glued into a 3D printed socket:

3D printed socket

3D printed socket

With this, I have a color cycling moon 🙂

red moon

red moon

purple moon

purple moon

white moon

white moon

Name Plate Version

Looking for another use case? At the university our institute chief assistant designed his own name plate:

Name Plate

Name Plate

Kind of boring, right? The next step in the evolution is to have something laser cut like this:

lasercut plywood name plate

lasercut plywood name plate

Having a MagLev available makes things a bit more exiting:

MagLev Plywood Name Plate

MagLev Plywood Name Plate

I like the Acrylic one too:

Acrylic MagLev Nameplate

Acrylic MagLev Nameplate

But maybe you like the version with the moon too:

MagLev Moon Nameplate

MagLev Moon Nameplate

It is cool to make such a MagLev device. All what it needs is some pre-built parts and putting them together.

Happy Mooning 🙂

Links

 

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4 thoughts on “DIY Wireless Magnetic Levitating Moon Lamp

  1. This post is so inspiring. Congratulations on the hard work and the results look great. You’ve given me a great idea to try.

    Like

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