Steampunk Lasercut Enclosure for Raspberry Pi

Having access to a laser cutter makes it possible to design custom enclosures. This one is for a Raspberry Pi in a Steampunk design:

Steampunk Enclosure

Steampunk Enclosure

The box is for a Raspberry Pi with a NXP tinyK22 board and a battery backup (see “Building a Raspberry Pi UPS and Serial Login Console with tinyK22 (NXP K22FN512)“).

Open Box

Open Box

The box is made of 4 mm birch plywood, then painted with walnut stain.

The rubber feet on the bottom are more for practical usage, maybe I replace them with a plywood version:

Bottom Side

Bottom Side

All the USB and the network port are still usable from the outside:

Side with network and USB ports

Side with network and USB ports

Same for the USB Power connectors and the video port on the back side:

Backside with power and video port

Backside with power and video port

An opening on the bottom side gives access to the microSD card:

Gears

Gears with microSD card access

Turning the knob on the center of the front plate moves the gears and opens up the box:

Open Box

Open Box

The gears havea bit of a high friction so I have to be careful not to apply to much force. But I’m very happy how it works right now.

With the box open, it gives access to the two USB ports of the tinyK22:

Open Box with USB Ports

Open Box with USB Ports

The cover includes a sliding door to give access to the LCD and the navigation/joystick inside:

Sliding top door

Sliding top door

The design has been created with Inkscape, and then sent to the laser cutter using LightBurn. If anyone is interested, I have put the design files on GitHub.

Happy enclosing 🙂

Links

8 thoughts on “Steampunk Lasercut Enclosure for Raspberry Pi

  1. Cool stuff! I’ve got an Nd:YAG marking laser that’s great for marking anodized aluminum or stainless steel, but it won’t quite cut through 1mm of foam. I’m going to have to get a laser cutter one of these days.

    If you like steampunk and doing artistic things with electronics, you should come out to Burning Man one of these days! The steampunk craze has died down a little, but I still have my obligatory steampunk goggles. I started on this year’s projects in earnest yesterday, and got a little banged up in a robot malfunction. Going to have a chat with that motor controller designer about the importance of watchdog timers.

    Like

      • Can’t remember if I already made the offer, but if you ever decide you want to go, hit me up for logistics support, and I could probably help you find a ticket as well – most years I have an extra, though this year’s is already promised to someone. I’m sure we could find you an extra tent and bicycle, and haul out everything that can’t be brought in on a plane. I think you’d enjoy the event. And I’m sure I’ve run into at least one Swiss camp.

        Like

        • Oh! That’s a great offer :-). I’m sure some Swiss folks might be able to get there. But it will be without me this year, unfortunately. Maybe next year.

          Like

  2. Erich,
    I enjoy your blog.
    I also have a laser cutter (modified K40 using Smoothieboard and Lightburn). I also usually use Inkscape, but I would also recommend checking out SolveSpace for those times when you need parameteric CAD; easy to learn and, considering it’s lightweight size and requirements, stunning in it’s capabilities.
    Also, I have noticed that you usually use plywood. Have you tried 1/8″ (3mm) MDF? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-density_fibreboard I assume it is available to you and I think you would find that it works well for what you are doing: clean cuts, harder, less sanding, no splinters or voids, etc. Like any material it is not perfect, but I find it works well for lots of things. Just a suggestion.
    Keep up the great work!

    Like

    • Hi Mark,
      yes, I have used 3mm MDF too. But not much because it is not as easy to get and it is more expensive. And for most designs I really like the wood surface of plywood.
      Enjoy your K40!

      Like

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.