All Saints Day with the Stoos Ridge Hike

The ‘All Saints Day’ (Nov 1st) is a public holiday for some parts of Switzerland. And because I’m lucky to live in that part and because it could have been one of the last days with excellent hiking conditions, I wanted to hike a trail which has been on my bucket list for a very long time: the ‘Gratwanderweg’ (ridge hike) on the Stoos.

Ridge Walk

Ridge Walk

The trail features a permanent 360° stunning view to the mountains and lakes in the area. And features the highest restaurant in the Canton of Schwyz, on the peak of the Fronalpstock.

One way for that tour is to take the cable car (Stoosbahn) up to the car free village of Stoos (1272 m). Than after a short walk, use the chairlift up to the Fronalpstock (1920 m). From there hike the trail to the Huser Stock and then to the Chlingenstock, and from there it is possible to take the chairlift down back to the Stoos. Because it was late of the year and the chairlift to from the Chlingenstock was not running any more, we decided to hike directly down back to the Stoos after the Huser Stock. With time for pick-nick and resting it takes around 6-7 hours.

Gratwanderweg Stoos

Gratwanderweg Stoos (Map source: https://map.schweizmobil.ch)

A new cable car track is now under construction:

New Stoos Bahn Construction Site

New Stoos Bahn Construction Site

Because it is not ready yet, we took the ‘old’ one. With a cable car it goes up from the Stoos base station up to the Stoos village:

Cable Car Tracks

Cable Car Tracks

Stoosbahn

Stoosbahn

After a short walk, we used the chairlift up to the Fronalpstock:

Sesselbahn auf Fronalpstock

Sesselbahn auf Fronalpstock

From the Fronalpstock, a stunning view to the Lake of the Four Cantons with Lucerne in the background:

View from Fronalpstock

View from Fronalpstock (click to enlarge)

Fronalpstock mit Blick auf Mythen

Fronalpstock with view to the Mythen (click to enlarge)

Hiking Trail Signs

Hiking Trail Signs

Fronalpstock gegen Glarner Alpen

Fronalpstock and Glarner Alps (click to enlarge)

The goal is to go up to the Huser Stuck:

Huser Stock

Huser Stock

View down to the Lake:

Urner See

Urner See (click to enlarge)

It was a sunny day, but part of the trails were still snow covered, frozen or muddy if not frozen any more.

Snow Covered Trails

Snow Covered Trails

The snow has been meltet away on the sunny side. The trail requires good hiking equipment plus better your are free of giddiness and you are not scared of heights:

Sunny Side

Sunny Side

The trail goes down to the Fureggen and then up to the Huser Stock:

View to Huser Stock

View to Huser Stock (click to enlarge)

Alp Fureggen mit Huser Stock

Alp Fureggen mit Huser Stock

‘Gratwanderweg’ means ‘ridge walk’, and indeed, this is what it is: a ridge walk with stunning views:

Gratwanderweg

Gratwanderweg (click to enlarge)

Ridge Walk

Ridge Walk (click to enlarge)

Fronalpstock Gratwanderweg

Fronalpstock Gratwanderweg

Grat zum Huser Stock

Grat zum Huser Stock (click to enlarge)

With probably one of the of the most scenic pick-nick place I know:

Picknick Platz beim Huser Stock

Picknick Platz beim Huser Stock

Ridge Walk Trail

Ridge Walk Trail

Then we reached the top of the Huser Stock (1904 m):

Cross on the Huser Stock

Cross on the Huser Stock

View from Huser Stock

View from Huser Stock (click to enlarge)

After a break, we started our descend.

Descending from Huser Stock

Descending from Huser Stock

The areas which do not get much sun are still snow covered and frozen:

Snow covered area

Snow covered area

Mythen

Mythen in the background (click to enlarge)

Alp Firnboden

Alp Firnboden

Stoos von AlpUnterbäch

Stoos von AlpUnterbäch

After one more hour, we returned back to the village Stoos.

Stoos

Stoos

And with the cable car, we returned back to our starting point.

Stossbahn

Stoosbahn

I hope you enjoyed that ridge walk.

Happy Gratwandering 🙂

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4 thoughts on “All Saints Day with the Stoos Ridge Hike

  1. Really stunning images Erich. I find it curious that one side of the mountains is covered in snow, while the other one isn’t. Could it be because it’s exposed more to the sun or to stronger winds? Perhaps the inclination? Looks strange to me.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Like

    • As the year enters Winter, the sun is more South with a shorter arc/day, for the Northern hemisphere, so the side of the mountain facing North gets no sun at all, if it is steep enough. Here in the Southern hemisphere (Australia), the sun is North in our Winter, so the South side is the side in the shade.

      Put another way, most our best ski runs are on the South side of the mountain.

      Great pic’s less res then you normally post though 😦

      Like

      • Yes, correct: the north side of the mountains don’t get as much sunlight as the side exposed to the south.
        About the picture resolution: yes, I did not post the full resolution images, because WordPress started charging me more money because of disk space used by this blog :-(. So I simply wanted to use less space, and you noticed. Maybe this was a bad idea?

        Like

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