Breakfast with Eggs Benedict, Sous-Vide Style

What is a Sunday morning without a perfect breakfast? With a Sous-Vide cooker in the kitchen, this small research project is about preparing Eggs Benedict Sous-Vide style:

Egg Benedict

Egg Benedict

In October 2004, I was on a business trip to Detroit. I remember that one very well, because that morning I enjoyed an amazing sunrise:

The other thing I remember (and I did not take a picture): I had my first ‘Egg Benedict’ for breakfast that morning. I did not know what it was when I ordered it, but it was such a good thing, I will always remember that first one.

Egg Benedict

Cooking Egg Benedict is not the most simple thing. The traditional cooking of Egg Benedict involves poaching the eggs in hot water which is not that easy. While researching recipes for Sous-Vide, I saw ways to avoid the poaching in hot water. Instead, the eggs can be poached with the egg-shell using a Sous-Vide cooker! So I decided this morning: this is something I have to try, and it was worth the efforts!

Egg Benedict‘ is a combination of:

  • Poached Egg
  • Ham (or Bacon)
  • Sauce Hollandaise (or Sauce Béchamel)
  • Toast or English Muffin

Eggs

The easiest part: The eggs get placed into 64°C warm water for one hour. I’m using a Sous-Vide Cooker to keep the temperature:

Placing Eggs into Sous Vide Cooker

Placing Eggs into Sous Vide Cooker

English Muffins

  • 450 g white flour
  • 1 cup lukewarm milk (~23°C)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoon yeast
English Muffin Flour

English Muffin Flour

Mix everything in a bowl and kneat for 10 minutes or until soft, smooth and stretchy.

English Muffin

English Muffin

Cover it and let it rest for about 30 minutes, until it has doubled in size.

Enlish Muffin Dough

English Muffin Dough

Doubled size after 30 minutes

Doubled size after 30 minutes

Place the dough on a work surface, roll it out to about 2 cm thick. Cut out the muffins, about 8 cm diameter, I’m using a beer glass 🙂 :

Cutting Out Muffins

Cutting Out Muffins

Place them on a baking sheet:

Muffins on Baking Sheet

Muffins on Baking Sheet

Leave it covered to prove for another 30 minutes:

After 30 more minutes

After 30 more minutes

Bake them on both sides in a hot pan, just that they have some brown surface:

Muffins In a Pan

Muffins In a Pan

Bake them for about 10 minutes in the preheated oven at 200°C:

Muffins in Oven

Muffins in Oven

Ham

Usually ‘Canadian Ham’ is used which is thicker. Different style does it as well. Browning in a pan and then wrap it in aluminium foil:

Ham in a pan

Ham in a pan

Placed it into the oven to keep it warm:

Muffins and Ham in Oven

Muffins and Ham in Oven

Sauce

Use your favorite sauce (Béchamel or Hollandaise): This time it is Sauce Hollandaise:

Sauce Hollandaise

Sauce Hollandaise

Serving

Cut the Muffins in half and toast them:

Toasted English Muffins

Toasted English Muffins

Place ham on the muffin. Take an egg out of the wather bath and carefully open it up on one end.

Peeling the Egg

Peeling the Egg

Just open it so you can drop the egg on top of the ham and muffin:

Droping Egg on Muffin

Dropping Egg on Muffin

Place sauce on top of it, plus any seasoning you like:

Egg Benedict

Egg Benedict

Below is a picture of the last one: it was about 10 minutes longer in the wather bath: still very good, but the egg could be a bit more liquid. The others were to the point:

Egg Benedict

Egg Benedict

Summary

Sous-Vide cooking Egg Benedict is now not that hard. Instead poaching eggs in hot water which is not that easy, I can cook them to the point in the water bath. Compared to poaching in hot water, the white part of the egg was a bit too soft, and the yellow part a bit to hard. But in any case it tasted very well :-).

Happy Benedicting 🙂

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11 thoughts on “Breakfast with Eggs Benedict, Sous-Vide Style

  1. I like the whites somewhat firm, but the yoke very runny. I tried the trick in the Serious Eats article for soft boiled eggs where you boil it for three minutes to set the white, chill it in an ice bath, and then sous-vide it. The appealing part of adding the sous-vide stage is that the egg becomes fully pasteurized and also nice and hot all the way through. Unfortunately, the one part of the process which is less predictable is the boiling to set the whites (the non sous-vide part). I used extra large eggs instead of a large eggs and the whites turned out less set than I like. Next time, I will use large eggs or extend the boiling time. I just recently picked up on sous-vide and really love the texture and done-ness of the proteins I have tried (steak and lamb). The off the wall ingredient I am looking to try? Octopus! (as part of a salad)

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  2. With the accurate temperature control obtainable with a Sous-Vide water bath, you could adapt the method employed by Heston Blumenthal:

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